Warren Daniel Crandall (1838 -1919)

Missouri Historical Society: During the Civil War, Warren Crandall [genealogy] served in the Mississippi Marine Brigade as 1st lieutenant on the ram Lioness. The Mississippi River Ram Fleet was formed by Charles Ellet in March 1862 and was succeeded by the Mississippi Marine Brigade. The Marine Brigade was recruited largely from other army organizations, under the authority of the War Department. The men were mustered out of service in December 1864. Following the war, Crandall practiced law in St. Louis and Brookfield, Missouri, and was editor of the Brookfield Gazette. He died June 30, 1919, in St. Louis.

LSU Library:

History of the ram fleet and the Mississippi marine brigade in the war for the union on the Mississippi and its tributaries. The story of the Ellets and their men
Crandall, Warren Daniel, 1838-
Personal Author: Crandall, Warren Daniel, 1838-
Title: History of the ram fleet and the Mississippi marine brigade in the war for the union on the Mississippi and its tributaries. The story of the Ellets and their men. Written and published under the auspices of their society of survivors.
Publication info: St. Louis [Press of Buschart brothers] 1907.
Physical descrip: 464, [28] p. incl. illus., ports. port. 22 cm.
General Note: "Author's foreword" signed: Warren D. Crandall ... Isaac D. Newell ...
Personal subject: Ellet, Charles, 1810-1862.
Personal subject: Ellet, Alfred Washington, 1820-1895.
Corporate subject: Mississippi marine brigade, 1863-1865.
Geographic term: United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Naval operations.
Geographic term: United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Regimental histories--Mississippi marine brigade.
Geographic term: Mississippi River--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
Added author: Newell, Isaac Denison, 1837-

Sinking of the Tug Clevelend

History of the Marine Brigade, p 276

The 23rd [of April, 1863] was an unfortunate day for the fleet. During that day, the [Steamer] Diana ran aground, and the tug Cleveland was sunk by running across the bows of the Diana, in an attempt to run alongside of her while she was still under way. The competent sailing master of the Autocrat, Samuel Henecks, at once set about the difficult task of raising the tug, and the following day had her again afloat. While lying at this point a large quantity of lumber, which had been worked up in a sawmill near by, was confiscated and brought to the boats. Early on the morning of the 25th, the fleet sailed again down stream. Landing at Clifton, which seemed to be a guerrilla rallying center, the infantry was put ashore and went into the country a distance of some four or five miles, but failed to find the enemy – reported to be in this section in some force. Upon this trip a large distillery was found and burned.